Sectoral Information

Some sectors are exposed to different Brexit-related issues than others, or are exposed to a greater extent. Below you will find information on sector-specific Brexit-related issues.

Retail

Distribution chains within the retail sector are highly integrated across Ireland and the UK. Many retail businesses, from independent retailers to large international chains directly or indirectly source their stock from, sell into, or move it through the UK.

If you intend to continue to trade with the UK post Brexit or your supply chain is partly dependent on the UK, you need to take steps to mitigate the impact of Brexit.

You need to consider: do you buy directly from a UK business and/or do you source UK products from a wholesaler or distributor?

If you source products from a wholesaler or distributor, do you know where your wholesaler or distributor purchases the product? If they purchase from the UK, then your business could be indirectly affected by Brexit and you should consider how to address this.

If you continue to source your stock directly from, or move it through the UK, you need to ensure that you are familiar with the new arrangements being put in place in relation to customs procedures and/or agricultural inspections; and depending on the type of product you import, you may have to pay tariffs after Brexit, all of which could impact on your current timelines, storage arrangements or cashflow.

Retail: What can I do now?

  • You should contact your UK suppliers, service providers and logistics companies, or your wholesalers and distributors, to seek assurances about the continuity of goods and services that you rely on for your business.
  • You should also check if your non-UK suppliers use the UK as a landbridge as there may be more lengthy lead times for delivery after Brexit and you need to consider the potential impact of this on your business.

If you have any doubts about continuity in your supply chain, you may need to consider the possibility of sourcing your goods or services in Ireland or elsewhere in the EU.

Retail: What supports are available to me?

To help you consider these questions or assess the impact of Brexit on your supply chain there are a number of Government supports available.

  • If you’re unsure where to start, you can contact one of the 31 Local Enterprise Offices (LEOs) across the country who can point you in the right direction. The LEOs also run a Brexit Mentor Programme to support business owners and managers to identify key Brexit exposures and develop robust strategies to address issues and maximise potential opportunities.
  • InterTradeIreland (ITI) offers up to €2,250 to help you engage professional advice to get Brexit ready and runs a Brexit Advisory Service to help businesses with practical advice, support and information on Brexit related issues. ITI also offers a follow-up Implementation Voucher to help businesses enact their Brexit plan.
  • Enterprise Ireland (EI) continue to run a number of Brexit Advisory Clinics across the country offering information and practical support to companies.
  • A €300 million Brexit Loan Scheme is open for eligible businesses with up to 499 employees to innovate, change or adapt in response to Brexit-related challenges. Loan amounts range from €25,000 up to €1.5m, for terms of up to three years and a maximum interest rate of 4%. Loans up to €500,000 unsecured. This may be useful for businesses who have Brexit impacts on their cashflow (conditions apply).

More supports to get your business Brexit Ready – Retail

Construction

There may be many Brexit implications for your construction manufacturing business beyond supply chain and customs.

Do you manufacture construction products?

If you rely on UK-issued certificates, licences or authorisations they may no longer be valid in the EU post-Brexit. To avoid disruption and delays, you will need to take the necessary steps to ensure you are compliant with EU rules.

A vast range of certification and licencing for the construction products market in the EU has to date been conducted by authorities and bodies in the UK. If the UK leaves the EU without a deal, the UK bodies may no longer have the authority to issue certificates or licences within the EU.

This means you will have to either: transfer to an EU authorised body or authority; or obtain new certificates, licences or authorisations issued by a designated EU body or authority.

Construction: What can I do now?

  • If your manufacture construction products you need to check whether your current certifications, licences or authorisations will be valid post-Brexit.
  • If you rely on UK Notified Bodies for conformity assessment and CE Marking; you will need to take the necessary steps to ensure that you hold certificates under the responsibility of an EU27 Notified Body to demonstrate compliance for products placed on the EU market post-Brexit.
  • In practice, this means either arranging for a transfer of certificates from a UK notified body to an EU27 Notified Body, or applying for a new certificate with an EU27 Notified Body. You can check the EU Commission NANDO website for a list of designated EU Notified Bodies.
  • If you buy your materials from or move them to the UK you must give consideration to the potential impacts on your supply chain.
  • If you buy or sell your materials from or to the UK you will need to understand new customs arrangements.
  • On 01 February 2019, the European Commission published Q&A for guidance on industrial products post-Brexit (PDF, 403KB). The document gives guidance in relation to Industrial Products in the event of the UK leaving the European Union without a ratified withdrawal agreement or ordered transition period. It relates to construction products covered by the Construction Products Regulation (EU) No 305/2011.
  • The document follows on from the Commission’s previous publication Notice to stakeholders – withdrawal of the United Kingdom and EU rules in the field of industrial products, dated 10 January 2018.
  • The National Standards Authority of Ireland (NSAI) has prepared a useful construction factsheet that you can consult for further information.

More supports to get your business Brexit Ready

Manufacturing

There may be many Brexit implications for your manufacturing business and it is vital that you examine your exposure and take action to mitigate impacts.

Manufacturing: What can I do now?

Certificates, licences and authorisations are required for trade in the EU for many types of goods such as manufactured goods covered by EU rules. If you rely on certificates, licences or authorisations issued by UK authorities or bodies, these may no longer be valid in the EU post-Brexit.

Manufacturing: How will Brexit affect my supply chain?

Do you buy directly from a UK business or do you source your components, goods or services from the UK. Or do you source products from a wholesaler or distributor? You need to understand the risks of Brexit for your business and you can do this now by checking where you source your materials. Your business could be indirectly affected by Brexit and you should consider how to address this. Contact your UK suppliers and service providers, particularly for key ingredients or components, to seek assurances about the continuity of goods and services you rely on for trade.

Manufacturing: How will Customs affect my business after Brexit?

You need to understand how customs and tariffs will impact your business. If you plan to continue to trade with the UK after Brexit you can take action now by registering with Revenue using your Revenue Online Service [ROS] account for an EORI number which will be required post-Brexit. If you intend to customs clear and import goods in your own name into the UK, you will also need to register with HMRC (the UK’s Revenue and Customs) and it is likely you will also be required to VAT register in the UK. You can learn more about customs here.

In practice, much of the customs requirements can be handled by an agent or operator moving your goods. You will however be responsible for providing your appointed agent with accurate information and with your EORI number. Incomplete or inaccurate information will lead to delays which could cost you money.

If you plan to continue to import/export goods to/from mainland Europe using the UK landbridge you need to understand that Customs procedures will also apply when the UK leaves the EU. There is a simplified Transit customs process for goods using the landbridge, but to avail of it you must put in place a Revenue approved comprehensive financial guarantee. This can take time, so you need to start this process with your financial provider and Revenue straight away to avoid delays and extra costs. You can do this yourself or get your customs agent or logistics company to do it for you but it is important to start the process now to be ready in time.

How will Brexit affect driving licences?

In the event of a no-deal Brexit the driving licence of a UK licence holder living here in Ireland will not be recognised and the driver will not be able to continue to drive here in Ireland on that licence. The advice to such drivers is that they should exchange their UK driving licence for an Irish driving licence before the 29 March 2019 (postponed to 31 October 2019), which is set as the withdrawal date of the UK from the EU.

How will Brexit affect my CPC (Certificate of Professional Competence) driving licence?

Under current arrangements a UK licence holder resident here in Ireland has an entitlement to make such an exchange. Go to the NDLS for more information.

Check that Drivers CPC is valid after Brexit. If Driver CPC is UK issues it can be exchanged prior to 29 March 2019 (postponed to 31 October 2019) for an Irish Drivers CPC from the Road Safety Authority.

Manufacturing: What supports are available to me?

To help you consider these questions or assess the impact of Brexit on your supply chain there are a number of Government supports available.

  • If you’re unsure where to start, you can contact one of the 31 Local Enterprise Offices (LEOs) across the country who can point you in the right direction. The LEOs also run a Brexit Mentor Programme to support business owners and managers to identify key Brexit exposures and develop robust strategies to address issues and maximise potential opportunities.
  • InterTradeIreland (ITI) offers up to €2,250 to help you engage professional advice to get Brexit ready and runs a Brexit Advisory Service to help businesses with practical advice, support and information on Brexit related issues. ITI also offers a follow-up Implementation Voucher to help businesses enact their Brexit plan.
  • Enterprise Ireland (EI) continue to run a number of Brexit Advisory Clinics across the country offering information and practical support to companies.
  • A €300 million Brexit Loan Scheme is open for eligible businesses with up to 499 employees to innovate, change or adapt in response to Brexit-related challenges. Loan amounts range from €25,000 up to €1.5m, for terms of up to three years and a maximum interest rate of 4%. Loans up to €500,000 unsecured. This may be useful for businesses who have Brexit impacts on their cashflow (conditions apply).

More supports to get your business Brexit Ready

Services

Trade in services is a complex area as there are different conditions and restrictions for different sectors and indeed individual businesses, with no one size fits all response that can be applied to all service sectors or businesses.

Should the UK exit without a deal, it will leave the Single Market which promotes trade in services across the EU through the “four freedoms”, that is, free movement of goods, capital, services and people.

The UK will no longer have to comply with EU law, such as the Services Directive, promoting the harmonisation of standards which recognises each Member State’s standard as equivalent. Other key legislative areas include mutual recognition of qualifications, legal services, data flows, telecommunications and intellectual property which all helps to support services trade.

The UK will therefore fall-back to WTO rules such as the General Agreement on Trade in Services (GATS) and the General Procurement Agreement (GPA). This will introduce significant change for businesses transacting with the UK both those providing services into the UK and those purchasing services from the UK.

Services: What can I do now?

  • You should consider your own unique course of action to prepare for a post-Brexit trading environment by examining your supply chain to look at your reliance on the UK markets
  • You could consider whether you want to seek alternative service providers either in Ireland or elsewhere in the EU. Similarly, if you provide services into the UK market, you need to consider your business model
  • You should make yourself aware of GPA thresholds as businesses could potentially be excluded from bidding for a range of projects and contracts that fall below these thresholds
  • You should consider the possible impact of General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) may have on your business as the UK would be considered a third country
  • Avail of supports available for businesses affected by Brexit

Visit gov.ie/brexit for more on what Brexit may mean for your business and your daily life.

Follow @BrexitReadyIRL

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