1 April 2019

Government advice for those driving Irish-registered vehicles in Northern Ireland and Great Britain

The decision of the UK to leave the EU means change. Addressing the challenges of the UK leaving the EU, particularly without any deal, requires response at EU level, by Government, by citizens and responses by businesses and affected sectors.

As part of our preparedness and contingency planning, the Irish Government identified that those driving in Northern Ireland and Great Britain may be impacted by Brexit.

The following is the latest Government advice that we can give you to help minimise any disruption to your travel.

Latest advice

Driving in the UK on an Irish licence
The UK Government’s stated position is that, post-Brexit, arrangements for EU licence holders who are visiting or living in the UK would not change. Visitors to the UK, with driving licences from EU Member States, will enjoy the same arrangements as today.

Proof of insurance (Green Cards)
The Motor Insurers’ Bureau of Ireland (MIBI) and the Association of British Insurers have advised those planning on driving Irish-registered vehicles in Northern Ireland or Great Britain, post-Brexit to get a Green Card from their insurance company.

If you intend to drive in Northern Ireland or Great Britain after Brexit and have not already received a Green Card, you should contact your insurance company to obtain one before you travel.

Green Cards are internationally recognised insurance documents, which act as proof of motor insurance when travelling internationally. Drivers travelling from Northern Ireland or Great Britain to Ireland will also be required to carry a Green Card.

MIBI, the body responsible for the Green Card system in Ireland, has circulated approximately 1 million Green Cards to insurers and brokers. All insurers are now issuing Green Cards on request from their customers, with some insurers automatically issuing Green Cards to those living in border Counties. A number of insurers are issuing Green Cards to all policyholders.

Insurance cover
At present, all motor vehicles from any EU country, including the UK, may travel within the EU without carrying special documentation to prove they have insurance in the country they are visiting. This will change if the UK leaves the EU without an agreement in place.

The vast majority of Irish motor insurance policies cover driving in the UK, as they refer to the UK specifically. A small number of policies may refer to travelling ‘in the EU’ rather than explicitly referring to the UK.

If you are in doubt, you should contact your insurance company to confirm that you have UK cover.

More information on gov.ie/brexit
Further information is available from www.gov.ie/brexit, which is regularly updated with the latest developments – so do check back regularly. This Government website provides practical advice to help businesses and citizens around the country to prepare for Brexit.

Government contingency work in this area

The Irish Government, working with the EU, has a comprehensive Contingency Action Plan to implement measures to mitigate the impact of Brexit. Regarding this area, here are some of the measures that have recently been undertaken:
• Government has been liaising with the MIBI to ensure preparedness for the possibility of Green Cards for several months.
• As part of its contingency planning, the Government has raised this matter directly with the European Commission. The European Commission advised the MIBI and International Council of Motor Insurers Bureaux that it is keeping the matter under ‘close and constant review’ as part of its Brexit preparedness work.
www.gov.ie/brexit

2 April 2019

Government advice for residents in Ireland with UK Driving Licences

The decision of the UK to leave the EU means change. Addressing the challenges of the UK leaving the EU, particularly without any deal, requires response at EU level, by Government, by citizens, and responses by businesses, and affected sectors.

As part of our preparedness and contingency plans, the Irish Government identified residents in Ireland with UK drivers licences as a key sector impacted by Brexit.

The following is the latest Government advice that we can give you to help minimise any disruption to you.

Latest advice

If you hold a UK driving licence and are resident in Ireland, you should apply to exchange your UK licence for an Irish licence before 12 April. Immediately post-Brexit, UK licences will not be valid for those who are resident in Ireland.

While the NDLS online booking service is now full for appointments pre 12 April, walk in appointments are still available, and many centres have extended their opening hours for the next number of weeks.

You should contact the National Driver Licence Service for further details. The NDLS has also published some useful FAQs on its website.

In the case of non-EU or ‘third’ countries, legislation exists under our Road Traffic Acts to allow for the recognition of foreign driving licences for exchange purposes. If there is a no deal Brexit, the UK will become a third country, and arrangements can then be made for the exchange of UK driving licences. Ireland is pursuing this option, however it may take a little time to complete as it involves the signing of a formal agreement with the UK and the introduction of secondary legislation here in Ireland.

In a no deal scenario and without such an agreement, this would mean that if you are resident in Ireland and have not exchanged your UK driving licence before the UK leaves the EU, you will need to apply for an Irish licence. Currently this involves completing a theory test, a course of driver training and passing a driving test.

UK licence holders who are visiting Ireland for up to 12 months will still have their licences recognised post-Brexit.

Government contingency work in this area

The Irish Government, working with the EU, has a comprehensive Contingency Action Plan to implement measures to mitigate the impact of Brexit. Regarding this area, here are some of the measures that have recently been undertaken:
• The Road Safety Authority have received approximately 18,000 UK exchange applications with approximately 11,000 UK licence exchanges approved and issued in the first three months of this year. They handled approximately 6,500 in all of 2018.
• Currently approximately 500 to 600 applications for licence exchange are being received daily with up to 600 being processed by the RSA daily.
• It can take 30 days to process a licence exchange for any country. The exchange of UK licences for Irish licences is currently taking 10-12 days.
• All licence exchanges are subject to due diligence by the RSA, which may require checks for endorsements on a licence before an exchange can be effected. This may lead to some exchanges taking longer than 12 days.
• There is a team working exclusively on the exchange and transfer of UK licences in the RSA, including at weekends. The National Driving Licence Service has extended opening hours both earlier in the morning and later in the evening in many of their centres, resulting in a total of 220 extra opening hours in the past week.
• Work is continuing on the preparation of a formal driving licence exchange agreement between Ireland and the UK, and the necessary secondary legislation required.
www.gov.ie/brexit

3 April 2019

Government advice for companies buying goods from the UK

The decision of the UK to leave the EU means change. Addressing the challenges of the UK leaving the EU, particularly without any deal, requires response at EU level, by Government, by citizens and responses by businesses and affected sectors.

As part of our preparedness and contingency planning, the Irish Government identified that companies buying goods from the UK may be impacted by Brexit, such as clothes boutiques, florists, salons, hardware stores and electrical goods shops.

The following is the latest Government advice available to help you to minimise any disruption to your business, if you operate in this sector.

Latest advice

In a no deal scenario, the UK will become a ‘third country’ for trading purposes. This will mean that new rules will apply for businesses importing, exporting or moving goods through the UK.

It is important that businesses undertake the necessary preparations to comply with these rules. Businesses should note that incomplete or inaccurate information in relation to customs declarations and procedures will lead to delays with knock-on impacts for your business.

All businesses
• All businesses that import, export or move their goods and materials from or through the UK need to register with Revenue for a customs number (EORI number). This applies irrespective of the volume or value of trade undertaken.
• All businesses should review their supply chain to assess how it may be affected and build contingency into their business planning and cash flow management. This may include instances where your business relies on products brought in from the UK through a distributor.
• Check if your business relies on products or services that are certified to conformity with EU regulations and standards by a UK body. These certificates or licences may no longer be valid in a no deal scenario and you will need to take the necessary steps to ensure compliance with EU regulations and standards. For further information, please see certification and licensing. Likewise, businesses are advised to monitor any changes that UK authorities may make over time to their regulatory requirements.
• Engage with any trade representative body of which you are a member. They can assist you in preparing for Brexit. Businesses can avail of free customs training through Enterprise Ireland, InterTradeIreland and the Local Enterprise Offices which aim to give businesses an understanding of the key customs concepts, documentation and processes required to succeed post-Brexit.
Businesses importing directly from the UK
• Businesses need to prepare for any new customs arrangements and regulatory checks and the impact they will have on their business. These include:
o Any requirements for pre-declarations and for health and safety checks for certain categories of goods (including animal or animal products, plants, plant products and wood packaging), and certain food products.
o Any required customs documentation and procedures for the payment of any customs and excise duties or VAT due on imports from third countries, including the UK in the event of a no deal scenario. Businesses will need to plan for this in terms of cash flow. Government has put in place postponed VAT accounting to reduce the impact of new arrangements on businesses’ cash flow.
• Businesses are advised to consider how they will handle these customs and regulatory formalities. These can be managed in-house or by a customs broker/agent. Either option requires planning and time.
• If your products are transported using wood packaging or pallets, check that the wood is International Standard for Phytosanitary Measure No. 15 (ISPM15) compliant.
More information available on gov.ie/brexit
Further information is available from www.gov.ie/brexit, is regularly updated with the latest developments so do check back regularly. This Government website provides practical advice to help businesses and citizens around the country to prepare for Brexit.

Government contingency work in this area

The Irish Government, working with the EU, has a comprehensive Contingency Action Plan to implement measures to mitigate the impact of Brexit. Since June 2016, the Government has put in place a suite of supports to help businesses, of all shapes and sizes and across all sectors of the economy, to prepare for Brexit. These supports are aimed at assisting business in all scenarios, including ‘No Deal’.

Leading Government Departments and agencies have consistently engaged with businesses to outline the steps that need to be taken to help businesses prepare for a new post-Brexit trading regime trade with the UK post Brexit.

Regarding this area, here are some of the measures that have recently been undertaken:
• Revenue has developed a comprehensive Trader Engagement Programme which has included direct letter contact with businesses, and briefing events across the country and experts speaking at a range of Brexit related events for the last number of years.
• Revenue directly wrote to approximately 84,000 individual companies (comprising three distinct trader groupings: large businesses, haulage/logistics companies and small and medium enterprises) to make them aware that trade with the UK post-Brexit will need to be conducted under the customs regime. The contact also provided advice and assistance in preparing for this change and to encourage them to engage with their supply chain partners and customs brokers or agents.
• Additionally, large businesses, hauliers and logistic companies were invited to attend dedicated Revenue Brexit seminars where additional information and advice on customs procedures, special procedures and simplifications was provided.
• Businesses also had an opportunity to engage with Customs experts, Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine, the HSE’s Environmental Health service, Enterprise Ireland, the Health & Safety Authority and other State Agencies and obtain detailed support and guidance particular to their business.
• Separate events were held for Customs software providers and customs agents to raise awareness of the likely increased demand for their services post-Brexit.
• Department of Business, Enterprise & Innovation is continuing to work with Brexit exposed firms, in particular clients of Enterprise Ireland (EI), IDA and the local enterprise offices (LEOs). The Department and its agencies have substantially reoriented their suites of enterprise supports, strategies and structures to cover the spectrum of potential Brexit impacts from liquidity support through short-term working capital loans for SMEs impacted by Brexit, to restructuring aid for businesses in severe operating difficulties.
• The Department is working with Enterprise Ireland to develop a Brexit targeted liquidity scheme to provide funding support to enterprises negatively impacted by the sudden changes in trading conditions, in order that they can adjust to these changed circumstances.
• Enterprise Ireland also launched online customs training to help businesses to prepare for its customs obligations. This free online course covers both import and export procedures.
• Dedicated Budget measures to get Ireland Brexit Ready were announced in Budgets 2017, 2018, and 2019. This included
o €600m Brexit package for farmers, fisherman and food small businesses over the three budgets
o €450m for business supports in 2017/2018
The full suite of preparedness supports are available at www.gov.ie/brexit > Brexit & Business > Government supports.

Useful numbers
• Over 84,000 businesses were identified as likely traders with the UK and were directly contacted by letter by Revenue to outline new measures and procedures
• Over 80 Brexit related event have taken place in 21 counties since September 2018 alone. The calendar is available at www.dfa.ie/brexit.
• There have been over 4,000 participants at LEO Brexit Information events
• Over 470 micro enterprises have been funded by LEOs to explore and develop new markets under the Technical Assistance for Micro Exporters (TAME) supports
• Over 5,000 companies have engaged with InterTradeIreland’s Brexit Advisory Service with almost 1,200 of the Brexit Start to Plan vouchers approved.
• €600m Brexit package for farmers, fisherman and food small businesses over the three budgets
• €450m for business supports in 2017/2018.
www.gov.ie/brexit

4 April 2019

Government advice for companies with their own transport who may be bringing goods through Irish ports

The decision of the UK to leave the EU means change. Addressing the challenges of the UK leaving the EU, particularly without any deal, requires response at the EU level, by Government, by citizens and responses by businesses and affected sectors.

As part of our preparedness and contingency planning, the Irish Government identified that
companies with their own transport who may be bringing goods through Dublin or Rosslare Ports.

The following is the latest Government advice that we can give you to help you to minimise any disruption to your business if you operate in this sector.

Latest advice

In a no deal scenario, the UK will become a ‘third country’ for trading purposes. This will mean that new rules will apply for businesses importing, exporting to or moving goods through the UK.

It is important that businesses undertake the necessary preparations to comply with these rules, for instance, incomplete or inaccurate information in relation to customs declarations and procedures will lead to delays with knock on impacts for your business.

All businesses
• All businesses that import, export or move their goods and materials from or through the UK need to register with Revenue for a customs number (EORI number). This applies irrespective of the volume or value of trade undertaken.
• All businesses should review their supply chain to assess how it may be affected and build this into their business planning and cash flow management. This may include where your business relies on products brought in from the UK through a distributor.
• Check if your business relies on products or services that are certified for conformity with EU regulations and standards by a UK body. These certificates or licences may no longer be valid in a no deal scenario and you will need to take the necessary steps to ensure compliance with EU regulations and standards. For further information, please see certification and licensing. Likewise, businesses are advised to monitor any changes that UK authorities may make over time to their regulatory requirements.
• Engage with any trade representative body of which you are a member. They can assist you in preparing for Brexit.
• Get free online customs training from Enterprise Ireland.
Businesses importing directly from the UK
• Businesses need to prepare for any new customs arrangements and regulatory checks and the impact they will have on their business. These include:
o Any requirements for pre-declarations and for regulatory checks for certain categories of goods (including animal or animal products, plants, plant products and wood packaging), and certain food products.
o Health and safety requirements for certain categories of goods (machinery, equipment and chemicals).
o Any required customs documentation and procedures for the payment of any customs and excise duties or VAT due on imports from third countries, including the UK in the event of a no deal scenario. Businesses will need to plan for this in terms of cash flow.
• If your products are transported using wood packaging or pallets, check that the wood is International Standard for Phytosanitary Measure No. 15 (ISPM15) compliant.
• Businesses are advised to consider how they will handle these customs and regulatory formalities. These can be managed in-house or by a customs broker/agent. Either option requires planning and time.
Businesses transporting goods through the UK
Businesses that move goods between Ireland and other EU countries by road through Britain (the UK landbridge) will face new rules and processes under the customs transit procedure.
This procedure will use the New Computerised Transit System and in order to use the landbridge in the most efficient way post-Brexit, businesses are encouraged to:
• Register as authorised consignors/consignees to avail of the Simplified Customs Transit Procedure. Further information is available on the Revenue website.
• Work through your bank or your customs agent/logistics provider to have the necessary financial guarantee in place
• If moving animals or animal products, work with the Department of Agriculture, Food & the Marine to register on the TRACES system.
Businesses can avail of free customs training through Enterprise Ireland, InterTradeIreland and the Local Enterprise Offices which aim to give businesses an understanding of the key customs concepts, documentation and processes required to succeed post-Brexit.

New phase of trader engagement at Irish ports announced today
Today Revenue has announced that they have embarked on a new phase of engagement with trade and business who may be transporting goods to, from or through the UK post Brexit. The latest information from Revenue is vital in helping truck drivers avoid congestion and delays for trucks coming into, and moving out of, Irish ports.

From Friday 5 April, Customs Officers will be talking with, and providing information to, truck drivers in Dublin and Rosslare Ports to ensure they understand and are aware of the changes that Brexit will mean for their journeys. Customs Officers will be talking with truck drivers as they wait to embark the ferry, and will also be available on-board a number of sailings.

Customs Officers are available to help drivers who may have concerns or questions about what they need to do post Brexit, and to help them understand what the changes will be for them as they move through Irish ports.

Government contingency work in this area
The Irish Government, working with the EU, has a comprehensive Contingency Action Plan to implement measures to mitigate the impact of Brexit. Since June 2016, the Government has put in place a suite of supports to help businesses, of all shapes and sizes and across all sectors of the economy, to prepare for Brexit. These supports are aimed at assisting business in all scenarios, including ‘No Deal’.

Leading Government Departments and agencies have consistently engaged with businesses to outline the steps that need to be taken to help businesses prepare for a new post-Brexit trading regime trade with the UK post Brexit.

Regarding this area, here are some of the measures that have recently been undertaken:
• Revenue has developed a comprehensive Trader Engagement Programme which has included direct letter contact with businesses, and briefing events across the country and experts speaking at a range of Brexit related events for the last number of years.
• Revenue directly wrote to approximately 84,000 individual companies (comprising three distinct trader groupings: large businesses, haulage/logistics companies and small and medium enterprises) to make them aware that trade with the UK post-Brexit will need to be conducted under the customs regime. The contact also provided advice and assistance in preparing for this change and to encourage them to engage with their supply chain partners and customs brokers or agents.
• Additionally, large businesses, hauliers and logistic companies were invited to attend dedicated Revenue Brexit seminars where additional information and advice on customs procedures, special procedures and simplifications was provided.
• Businesses also had an opportunity to engage with Customs experts, Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine, the HSE’s Environmental Health service, Enterprise Ireland, the Health & Safety Authority and other State Agencies and obtain detailed support and guidance particular to their business.
• Separate events were held for Customs software providers and customs agents to raise awareness of the likely increased demand for their services post-Brexit.
• Department of Business, Enterprise & Innovation is continuing to work with Brexit exposed firms, in particular clients of Enterprise Ireland (EI), IDA and the local enterprise offices (LEOs). The Department and its agencies have substantially reoriented their suites of enterprise supports, strategies and structures to cover the spectrum of potential Brexit impacts from liquidity support through short-term working capital loans for SMEs impacted by Brexit, to restructuring aid for businesses in severe operating difficulties.
• The Department is working with Enterprise Ireland to develop a Brexit targeted liquidity scheme to provide funding support to enterprises negatively impacted by the sudden changes in trading conditions, in order that they can adjust to these changed circumstances.
• Enterprise Ireland also launched online customs training to help businesses to prepare for its customs obligations. This free online course covers both import and export procedures.
• Dedicated Budget measures to get Ireland Brexit Ready were announced in Budgets 2017, 2018, and 2019. This included
o €600m Brexit package for farmers, fisherman and food small businesses over the three budgets
o €450m for business supports in 2017/2018
The full suite of preparedness supports are available at www.gov.ie/brexit > Brexit & Business > Government supports.

Useful numbers

• Over 84,000 businesses were identified as likely traders with the UK and were directly contacted by letter by Revenue to outline new measures and procedures
• Over 80 Brexit related event have taken place in 21 counties since September 2018 alone. The calendar is available at www.dfa.ie/brexit.
• There have been over 4,000 participants at LEO Brexit Information events
• Over 470 micro enterprises have been funded by LEOs to explore and develop new markets under the Technical Assistance for Micro Exporters (TAME) supports
• Over 5,000 companies have engaged with InterTradeIreland’s Brexit Advisory Service with almost 1,200 of the Brexit Start to Plan vouchers approved.
• €600m Brexit package for farmers, fisherman and food small businesses over the three budgets
• €450m for business supports in 2017/2018.
www.gov.ie/brexit

5 April 2019

Government advice for traders of food and food products

5 April 2019

Addressing the challenges of a no deal Brexit takes place at a number of levels and requires responses at EU level, responses by Government, responses by citizens and responses by businesses and affected sectors.

While extensive Brexit preparedness and contingency planning has already been undertaken across Government, it is only by working together with businesses and our citizens that we can aim to mitigate the impacts of a no deal Brexit and ensure that we are prepared to the greatest extent possible.

As part of our preparedness and contingency plans, the Government identified those operators and businesses engaged in importing, exporting or moving food and food products from or through the UK as a key sector impacted by Brexit.

The following is the latest advice that we can give you to help you to minimise any disruption to your business if you operate in this sector.

Latest advice on gov.ie/brexit

In a no deal scenario, the UK will become a ‘third country’ for trading purposes. This will mean that new rules will apply to operators and businesses importing from, exporting to or moving goods through the UK.

These include a range of sanitary and phytosanitary checks for food and food products. Furthermore, there are specific rules applying to wood packaging used in the movement of goods.

It is important that businesses undertake the necessary preparations to be ready for compliance with these changes, as incomplete documentation, inaccurate information or late submission of documentation will lead to delays, with knock on impacts for your business.

All businesses
• All businesses need to review their supply chain to assess how it may be affected, and build this into their business planning and cash flow management.
• All operators and businesses that trade with or move goods through the UK need to register with Revenue for an Economic Operators Registration and Identification number – see link to customs number. This applies irrespective of the volume or value of trade undertaken. Operators and businesses also need to register with the Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine (DAFM) – see below.
• If your products are transported using wood packaging or pallets, check that the wood is International Standard for Phytosanitary Measure No. 15 (ISPM15) compliant.
• Engage with any trade representative body of which you are a member. They can assist you in preparing for Brexit.

Businesses trading with the UK

• Businesses need to prepare for any new customs arrangements and regulatory checks and the impact they will have. This includes any customs obligations or formalities that may be required by the UK authorities. Businesses exporting food, plants, animals or animal products to the UK are advised to refer to the UK central government published information.
• Businesses should consider how they will handle these customs and regulatory formalities. These can be managed in-house or by customs broker/agent. Either option requires planning and time.

Specifically for businesses importing certain food/drink products
• Most food products of non-animal origin from the UK will not require any additional import controls. However, some will.
• Products from other third countries, previously cleared by the UK for free circulation in the EU, may now require controls in Ireland as the first point of entry to the EU.
• Check the relevant regulations in case increased controls and prior-notification of importation is needed for a specific product. For further information, see the Food Safety Authority of Ireland and the European Commission.
• Submit your documentation to the HSE Environmental Health Service as early as possible. Products subject to increased official controls or emergency/safeguard measures must be notified to importcontroldublin@hse.ie with all required documents at least one working day prior to arrival.

Specifically for businesses exporting food products

• After the UK leaves the EU, the UK will determine its requirements for the import of products, plants and animals into the UK.
• While the UK have published some guidance papers UK Preparedness Notices regarding their requirements, they are subject to change with limited notification. Therefore the Department recommends that you check the UK Government websites for the latest information.
• If you are exporting wild caught fish or fishery products, a Catch Certificate will be required – see Sea-Fisheries Protection Authority for further information.

All businesses transporting goods through the UK

• Businesses that move animals and goods between Ireland and other EU countries by road through the UK landbridge will need to ensure compliance with the customs transit procedure and with the SPS requirements.
• Animals and goods must be moved through the UK in accordance with Customs transit procedure. This requires the use of the New Computerised Transit System. There are simplifications available such as registering as authorised consignors/consignees. Please note that a financial guarantee is required.
• If transporting animals or animal products, you must be registered on TRACES.
• You must complete and submit the relevant part of the Common Veterinary Entry Document (CVED) in TRACES in advance of the consignment’s re-entry into the EU. Current intraCommunity rules continue to apply in relation to documentary and sealing requirements, with the exception of bovine and ungulate animals for immediate slaughter.

Businesses can sign up for Enterprise Ireland’s Customs Insights, a short online programme that aims to give businesses a good understanding of the key customs concepts, documentation and processes required to succeed post-Brexit.

The department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine has a dedicated call centre for Brexit Queries which can be contacted at 076 106 4443 or to BrexitCall@agriculture.gov.ie

Government contingency work in this area

The Irish Government, working with the EU, has a comprehensive Contingency Action Plan to implement measures to mitigate the impact of Brexit. Since June 2016, the Government has put in place a suite of supports to help businesses, of all shapes and sizes and across all sectors of the economy, to prepare for Brexit. These supports are aimed at assisting business in all scenarios, including ‘No Deal’.

Leading Government Departments and agencies have consistently engaged with businesses to outline the steps that need to be taken to help businesses prepare for a new post-Brexit trading regime trade with the UK post Brexit.

Regarding this area, here are some of the measures that have recently been undertaken:
• Veterinary and Plant Health officials from the Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine briefed businesses at Trader Engagement events across the country, as part of the Revenue Trader Engagement Programme.
• Businesses also had an opportunity to engage with Customs experts, the HSE’s Environmental Health service, Enterprise Ireland and other State Agencies and obtain detailed support and guidance particular to their business.
• Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine issued Trader Notices on a range of issues directly to businesses and have provided extensive information and guidance on their website
• Additionally, Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine have engaged with representative organisations, large businesses, hauliers and logistic companies
• The Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine has established a dedicated Information Line (9076 106 4443) and email address (BrexitCall@agriculture.gov.ie) for operators in the sector
• A range of advisory and financial supports provided by Agencies including Bord Bia, Bord Iascaigh Mhara and Enterprise Ireland
• Dedicated Budget measures to get Ireland Brexit Ready were announced in Budgets 2017, 2018, and 2019. These included:
o A €78 million Brexit package for farmers, fishermen, and food SMEs in the 2019 Budget
o A new longer-term loan scheme of up to €300 million, the Future Growth Loan Scheme, in Budget 2019. This scheme, jointly funded by the Department of Business, Enterprise and Innovation and the Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine, will provide long term, unsecured investment finance for farmers, fishermen and small scale companies in the food and seafood sectors. This builds on loan schemes announced in the two previous Budgets.
• Revenue has developed a comprehensive Trader Engagement Programme which has included direct letter contact with businesses, and briefing events across the country and experts speaking at a range of Brexit related events for the last number of years.
• Revenue have embarked on a next phase of engagement with trade and business who may be transporting goods to, from or through the UK post Brexit. The latest information from Revenue is vital in helping truck drivers avoid congestion and delays for trucks coming into, and moving out of, Irish ports.
• From Friday 5 April, Customs Officers will be talking with, and providing information to, truck drivers in Dublin and Rosslare Ports to ensure they understand and are aware of the changes that Brexit will mean for their journeys. Customs Officers will be talking with truck drivers as they wait to embark the ferry, and will also be available on-board a number of sailings.

The full suite of preparedness supports are available at www.gov.ie/brexit > Brexit & Business > Government supports.
www.gov.ie/brexit

If you are living or working in Northern Ireland, you can find further information at www.gov.ie/brexit

Check out the Irish Government’s dedicated website for all Brexit information:
www.gov.ie/brexit

8 April 2019

Government advice for traders of animals and animal products

8 April 2019

Addressing the challenges of a no deal Brexit takes place at a number of levels and requires responses at the EU level, responses by Government, responses by citizens, and responses by businesses and affected sectors.

While extensive Brexit preparedness and contingency planning has already been undertaken across Government, it is only by working together with businesses and our citizens that we can aim to mitigate the impacts of a no deal Brexit and ensure that we are prepared to the greatest extent possible.

As part of our preparedness and contingency plans, the Government identified those operators and businesses engaged in importing, exporting or animals, animals products and food of animal origin from or through the UK as a key sector impacted by Brexit.

The following is the latest advice that we can give you to help you to minimise any disruption to your business if you operate in this sector.

Latest advice on gov.ie/brexit

In a no deal scenario, the UK will become a ‘third country’ for trading purposes. This will mean that new rules will apply to operators and businesses importing from, exporting to or moving goods through the UK.

These include a range of sanitary and phytosanitary checks for animals, animal products and food of animal origin. Furthermore, there are specific rules applying to wood packaging used in the movement of goods.

It is important that businesses undertake the necessary preparations to be ready for compliance with these changes, as incomplete documentation, inaccurate information or late submission of documentation will lead to delays, with knock on impacts for your business.

All businesses
• All businesses need to review their supply chain to assess how it may be affected and build this into their business planning and cash flow management.
• All operators and businesses that trade with or move goods through the UK need to register with Revenue for a customs number (EORI number). This applies irrespective of the volume or value of trade undertaken. Operators and businesses also need to register with the Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine (DAFM) – see below.
• If your products are transported using wood packaging or pallets, check that the wood is International Standard for Phytosanitary Measure No. 15 (ISPM15) compliant.
• Engage with any trade representative body of which you are a member. They can assist you in preparing for Brexit.

Businesses trading with the UK
• Businesses need to prepare for any new customs arrangements and regulatory checks and the impact they will have. This includes any customs obligations or formalities that may be required by the UK authorities. Businesses exporting food, plants, animals or animal products to the UK are advised to refer to the UK central government published information.
• Businesses should consider how they will handle these customs and regulatory formalities. These can be managed in-house or by customs broker/agent. Either option requires planning and time.
Specifically for businesses importing animals or animal products.
• The person responsible for importing the consignment must register with the Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine and with the EU’s Trade Control and Expert System (TRACES), see link at DAFM Registration. If acting as an agent, the person responsible for the load should check that the customer that they are importing on behalf of is also registered on TRACES.
• Check that the exporting establishment is listed on TRACES.
• Check that the relevant veterinary health certificates and other documents required by EU legislation for imports into the EU have been completed and that original copies of the certificates will be travelling with the consignments.
• Make sure your transporter or haulier of live animals is in possession of the required EU authorisations.
• At least 24 hours in advance of the consignment arriving at the point of first entry into the EU, complete Part 1 of the Common Veterinary Entry Document on TRACES. At the same time email a copy of the signed veterinary health certificate and any other relevant documentation that is required for DAFM to process the consignment, along with the CVED number and the SAD number (when this becomes available) to the relevant electronic mailbox.
• Consignments of animals and animal products must be presented at the border inspection post at the point of first arrival in the EU for official controls in compliance with EU legislation. Further details in relation to these requirements can be found using the following link.
• If you are importing wild caught fish or fishery products, a Catch Certificate will be required – see Sea-Fisheries Protection Authority for further information.
Specifically for businesses exporting animals, animal products and food
• After the UK leaves the EU, the UK will determine its requirements for the import of products, plants and animals into the UK.
• While the UK have published some guidance papers UK Preparedness Notices regarding their requirements, they are subject to change with limited notification. Therefore the Department recommends that you check the UK Government websites for the latest information.
• If you are exporting wild caught fish or fishery products, a Catch Certificate will be required – see Sea-Fisheries Protection Authority for further information.

All businesses transporting animal goods through the UK
• Businesses that move animals and goods between Ireland and other EU countries by road through the UK landbridge will need to ensure compliance with the customs transit procedure and with the SPS requirements.
• Animals and goods must be moved through the UK in accordance with Customs transit procedure. This requires the use of the New Computerised Transit System. There are simplifications available such as registering as authorised consignors/consignees. Please note that a financial guarantee is required.
• If transporting animals or animal products, you must be registered on TRACES.
• You must complete and submit the relevant part of the Common Veterinary Entry Document (CVED) in TRACES in advance of the consignment’s re-entry into the EU. Current intraCommunity rules continue to apply in relation to documentary and sealing requirements, with the exception of bovine and ungulate animals for immediate slaughter.
Businesses can sign up for Enterprise Ireland’s Customs Insights, a short online programme that aims to give businesses a good understanding of the key customs concepts, documentation and processes required to succeed post-Brexit.

The department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine has a dedicated call centre for Brexit Queries which can be contacted at 076 106 4443 or to BrexitCall@agriculture.gov.ie

Government contingency work in this area

The Irish Government, working with the EU, has a comprehensive Contingency Action Plan to implement measures to mitigate the impact of Brexit. Since June 2016, the Government has put in place a suite of supports to help businesses, of all shapes and sizes and across all sectors of the economy, to prepare for Brexit. These supports are aimed at assisting business in all scenarios, including ‘No Deal’.

Leading Government Departments and agencies have consistently engaged with businesses to outline the steps that need to be taken to help businesses prepare for a new post-Brexit trading regime trade with the UK post Brexit.

Regarding this area, here are some of the measures that have recently been undertaken:
• Veterinary and Plant Health officials from the Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine briefed businesses at Trader Engagement events across the country, as part of the Revenue Trader Engagement Programme.
• Businesses also had an opportunity to engage with Customs experts, the HSE’s Environmental Health service, Enterprise Ireland and other State Agencies and obtain detailed support and guidance particular to their business.
• Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine issued Trader Notices on a range of issues directly to businesses and have provided extensive information and guidance available on their website
• Additionally, Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine have engaged with representative organisations, large businesses, hauliers and logistic companies
• The Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine has established a dedicated Information Line (9076 106 4443) and email address (BrexitCall@agriculture.gov.ie) for operators in the sector
• A range of advisory and financial supports provided by Agencies including Bord Bia, Bord Iascaigh Mhara and Enterprise Ireland. For example:
o Businesses can sign up for Bord Bia’s Customs and Controls Training Programme that aims to give businesses a strong understanding of the customs, documentation, tariffs and SPS processes required to succeed post-Brexit.
o Businesses can sign up for Bord Bia’s Supply Chain Mentoring Programme that aims to give businesses a strong understanding of the logistics and trade processes required to succeed post-Brexit.
o Bord Bia’s Supply Chain Strategy Guide, alongside the Logistics Service Provider Directory, aims to assist Irish food and drink manufacturers to identify operations partners, establish more efficient distribution channels or routes and identify possible strategies for managing Brexit.
• Dedicated Budget measures to get Ireland Brexit Ready were announced in Budgets 2017, 2018, and 2019. These included:
o A €78 million Brexit package for farmers, fishermen, and food SMEs in the 2019 Budget
o A new longer-term loan scheme of up to €300 million, the Future Growth Loan Scheme, in Budget 2019. This scheme, jointly funded by the Department of Business, Enterprise and Innovation and the Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine, will provide long term, unsecured investment finance for farmers, fishermen and small scale companies in the food and seafood sectors. This builds on loan schemes announced in the two previous Budgets.
• Revenue has developed a comprehensive Trader Engagement Programme which has included direct letter contact with businesses, and briefing events across the country and experts speaking at a range of Brexit related events for the last number of years.
• Revenue have embarked on a next phase of engagement with trade and business who may be transporting goods to, from or through the UK post Brexit. The latest information from Revenue is vital in helping truck drivers avoid congestion and delays for trucks coming into, and moving out of, Irish ports.
• From Friday 5 April, Customs Officers will be talking with, and providing information to, truck drivers in Dublin and Rosslare Ports to ensure they understand and are aware of the changes that Brexit will mean for their journeys. Customs Officers will be talking with truck drivers as they wait to embark the ferry, and will also be available on-board a number of sailings.
The full suite of preparedness supports are available at www.gov.ie/brexit > Brexit & Business > Government supports.

9 April 2019

Government information and advice to consumers in relation to healthcare and medical products

Addressing the challenges of a no deal Brexit takes place at a number of levels and requires responses at the EU level, responses by Government, responses by citizens, and responses by businesses and affected sectors.

While extensive Brexit preparedness and contingency planning has already been undertaken across Government, it is only by working together with the healthcare sector, businesses and our citizens that we can aim to mitigate the impacts of a no deal Brexit and ensure that we are prepared to the greatest extent possible.

As part of our preparedness and contingency plans, the Government identified healthcare provision and supply of medicines as an area where people may have queries in relation to Brexit. Below is the latest information and advice for citizens on this issue.

Latest information and advice on gov.ie/Brexit

Healthcare
Ireland and the UK have a number of areas in the provision of healthcare where we are interconnected.

Some of our medicines are moved through the UK to get to Ireland. However, Ireland is unlikely to face general medicines supply issues in the period immediately post-Brexit, even in a no deal scenario.

Under the Common Travel Area, Irish citizens and British citizens who live in, work in, or visit the other state have the right to access healthcare there. Both the Irish and British Governments are committed to maintaining the current healthcare arrangements under the CTA. Other North South cooperation arrangements will also continue on the island of Ireland.

General medical supplies
The pharmaceutical industry and medicines wholesalers, who are working closely with Government in this area, are confident there are enough stocks of medicines in the country to manage any potential supply issues at ports. Medicines shortages occur from time to time, and there are already additional stocks of medicines routinely built into the Irish medicine supply chain to address shortages when they occur.

Anyone with an ongoing need for medicines should fill their prescription as normal. You do not need to order extra quantities of medicines or extra prescriptions ahead of Brexit. If you do, you could disrupt existing stock levels and hamper the supply of medicines for other patients.

If you have any concerns, please speak to your pharmacist.

Access to health services
Irish citizens and British citizens who live in, work in, or visit the other State will continue to have the right to access healthcare there. Government has introduced legislation to ensure these access arrangements can be maintained post-Brexit, even in the event of no deal. For more information on health related matters post-Brexit, please visit the Department of Health.

Cross border access to health services
Cross border health services (like the cardiology and cancer treatments in Altnagelvin, Derry and paediatric cardiology and maternity services in Dublin) are managed by service level agreements. Even in a no deal Brexit scenario, services like these can be expected to continue. Both the Irish and UK Governments are fully committed to continuing existing cross border arrangements.

Further information at gov.ie/brexit

Further information is available from www.gov.ie/brexit. This website is regularly updated with the latest developments so do check back regularly.

If you are living or working in Northern Ireland, you can find further information at www.gov.ie/brexitni.

Notes to Editors
• Department of Health Press Office: press_office@health.gov.ie
• Department of Health Brexit video is available here
Government work to date in this area
The Irish Government, working with the EU, has a comprehensive Contingency Action Plan to implement measures to mitigate the impact of Brexit. Regarding this area, here are some of the measures that have recently been undertaken:
• In relation to the continuity of supply of medicines in the event of a no-deal Brexit, significant work has already been undertaken by the Department of Health, the HSE, and the Health Products Regulatory Agency (HPRA), together with industry, to minimise and address any risks to continuity of supply.
• The supply chain for medicines is complex, and shortages are an increasing feature of the global medicines landscape faced by all countries on an ongoing basis, irrespective of Brexit.
• In 2018, the HPRA launched the Medicine Shortages Framework to mitigate the impact of medicine shortages when they occur. This Framework is used to manage and address shortage notifications.
• Pharma companies have been engaging in extensive Brexit planning for the last two years, and advanced arrangements are in place to ensure continuity of supply. Both the HPRA and HSE are working closely with companies to highlight any issues regarding the availability of specific products associated with Brexit.
• The health system is therefore well placed to anticipate and respond to any additional shortages, should they arise because of Brexit.

Check out the Irish Government’s dedicated website for all Brexit information:
www.gov.ie/brexit

Copyright © 2019 Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, All rights reserved.

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